Category Archives: Cheese

Pierogi Project: My first time making homemade pierogi

For the past three Valentine’s Days, James and I have stayed home and made ourselves some steak.  Mostly because going out to dinner on Valentine’s Day is akin to voluntarily being robbed.    And we were incredibly pleased with our decision when, around 7pm, a horribly windy snowstorm whipped snow against our window, and the highway was completely obscured from view.  Since we’re living on the 7th floor, the rest of the weekend promises to transform our apartment into a drafty haunted house.

And because Valentine’s Day was on a Saturday this year, I realized that we could take on a cooking project, something we’ve always wanted to try to make from scratch but didn’t have the time.  A lot of ideas were batted around until we decided that we would have steak and pierogi.DSC_0133

This seemed brilliant at the time but as I continued to research recipes, it became more and more intimidating.  We weren’t just trying a new recipe: we were making pasta dough, which we’ve never done by ourselves, making mashed potatoes, which I hate doing, and then filling the dumplings, which is what I had been regarding as the most difficult part.

There are lots of interesting pierogi recipes out there, as this is a traditional celebratory dish in several cultures, but the one I ended up using was from Sydney Oland of Serious Eats.  It seemed the most straight-forward to me, but that’s because the recipe is written very matter-of-factly.  To novice pierogi makers, like we were (are?), there was a lot of supplemental information we needed to search for as the day went on.DSC_0113

However, the results were delectable and our apartment smelled amazing for days.  Here, I detail James’ and my first foray into pierogi making – hopefully these tips will help you on your own pierogi journey!DSC_0221

Pierogi filled with potatoes and cheddar cheese

Recipe by Sydney Oland at Serious Eats, one of my most trusted sources for reliable food and cooking intel

Ingredients

Dough:

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • large pinch of salt (I used 1/8 tsp)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil (I used olive oil)

Filling:

  • 2 large Russet potatoes
  • 1 1/2 cup shredded sharp Cheddar
  • Kosher salt and cracked black pepper
  • 1 sliced onion fried in 1 tablespoon butter (optional) (but not really)

Procedures:

  1. Make Dough: Place flour and salt in a large bowl and make a well in the center. Add water, egg and vegetable oil and mix, slowly incorporating flour until soft dough forms.
  2. Turn soft dough out onto floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes.
  3. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and let rest for 1 hour.
  4. To make filling: Wash potatoes and peel (or use food mill, see below) and cut into 1 inch pieces.
  5. Boil in salted water until potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.
  6. Drain potatoes, place in a large bowl and mash with a potato masher or fork (or food mill, see below) slowly adding grated cheese.
  7. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  8. Assemble pierogi: Divide dough in half, reserving other half under a kitchen towel.
  9. *Divide halved dough into 24 evenly sized pieces. Roll each piece into a round about 1/8-inch thick.*
  10. Wet edges of dough and place a rounded teaspoon worth of filling in center of round.
  11. Close dough around filling creating a semicircle sealing edges with fingers (or crimp with a fork).
  12. Repeat with all remaining dough (there may be some filling left).
  13. Boil a large pot of water, and working in batches, cook pierogi until they rise to the top of the boiling water.
  14. Another change.  Once all of the pierogi were boiled, we sauteed them in oil to get a nice, crisp browning.  More on that below…

*Here we differed.  Instead of rolling out the dough into pieces, we rolled out one big piece to 1/8 inch thick and used a biscuit cutter (but a cookie cutter would work too), to cut out circles in order to make pierogi in the shape to which we’re accustomed: the crimped half moon.

Pictures and Anecdotes:

Making Pasta Dough:

I’ve only ever made pasta from scratch once, in a cooking class that I took with my brother Dan eight years ago.  So you could say that I was rusty.  I had decided that we would make the dough in the food processor, which would do most of the kneading for us because I didn’t feel confident that I could teach myself how to knead.

So we started in the food processor, but because this dough contains a cup of water, the water started to seep out of the food processor and all over the counter.  This may have been avoided if we had added the ingredients in a certain order, perhaps the water and then the flour, so the water would seep into the flour and not spill.  But we added the flour first, then the water, which spilled over the middle of the processor, the cavity where the mechanics of the processor meets the food bowl.

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James, in his wisdom, said we should salvage all the ingredients and mix them in a bowl with a spoon.  I was skeptical, since I’d never seen it done that way before – there’s usually a complex, delicate mixing procedure that looks like this.  However, once James mixed it all together, the dough looked exactly how it does at the end of the complex procedure, so we just decided to move ahead!

So, we needed to teach ourselves how to knead and found this video from Giuliano Hazan to help us.  (Fun fact!  I used this video completely ignorant to the fact that Giuliano is the author of the first cookbook I ever owned and the son on Marcella Hazan, who I just watched on Mind of Chef today and who is regarded as the “Godmother of Italian Cooking.”  I’d say we found a pretty reliable source!)

The steps we found are as follows:
1.  Flour the surface you’ll be working on – I tried using parchment, but it moved around too much.  I eventually switched to a wood cutting board.
2. Mold the dough into a ball so you can work with it.  It will be very sticky!  Add flour as often as you please throughout the process.
3.  Stretch the dough a little so that you can fold it over one hand like a book.DSC_0012
4. With the heel of your hand, push the dough back on to itself twice, like you’re trying to seal those edges together while also forming the dough back into a ball.DSC_0014
5. Turn the dough 1/4 turn and repeat.

As the recipe says, you knead for about 8 minutes until your dough is not so sticky and feels elastic.  What does elastic mean?  Think of a rubber band – it can be stretched but will snap back into its shape.  The dough won’t be exactly like a rubber band, but it will feel tougher than when you started and you can imagine rolling it.  If you’re not sure, just take the time into consideration – if you’ve kneaded for 8 minutes, it’s probably good to go.  You don’t have to knead continuously, either.  James and I switched at one point so we could both get a chance to try it.

Ready to hydrate!
Ready to hydrate!

Now you let the dough rest under a towel to hydrate.  The recipe says 1 hour, but we waited about 1.5 hours because we were doing other things in the kitchen.

Mashed Potatoes

Now we made the potatoes.  I hardly ever cook potatoes in my house because they’re such a pain – you have to scrub them, some people peel them (but I never do because that’s where all the nutrients are), and then boil, and then mash.  I just don’t like mashed or roasted potatoes enough to go to the trouble, especially on a weeknight.  However, the pierogi memories we had included mashed potatoes, so this was a must.  It also gave me the excuse to use my food mill, which James bought me about 3 years ago and I still had never used.DSC_0017

The food mill is featured on cooking shows a lot for mashed potatoes and for tomato sauce.  It’s used to make uniform, gorgeous texture and also keeps skins of potatoes and tomatoes out of your mixture.  It was also very easy to use, once we realized that all three blades were locked into the machine for storage, and we needed to choose one before proceeding.  Unfortunately, I didn’t realize this until after I already fed potatoes into the machine.  I don’t call this blog “Amateur Hour” for nothing.DSC_0076

Anyways, you feed to potatoes into the top of the machine and turn a crank that pushes the potatoes through the shredder blade and into the bowl below.  Some skins get shredded but most stay at the top, keeping the texture uniform.  It’s pretty badass.  The best part is that the whole mechanism is dishwasher safe.

Action shot!
Action shot!

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Once the potatoes were milled, I added the cheese and incorporated them together with a potato masher, my favorite non-fancy potato tool.  It can be used in lots of applications when you need to mash something, like avocado or mixing something hard into cookie dough like chocolate chips or nuts.

Back to our pasta dough.

Look at how it's hydrated after an hour (and a half)!
Look at how it’s hydrated after an hour (and a half)!


The big change we made to the recipe was that we decided to roll the dough out into one big sheet instead of rolling each individual piece.  It seemed like it would cut down on time.DSC_0105

Rolling pasta dough is different than any other dough I’ve worked with (mostly cookie dough.)  The elasticity we talked about earlier makes the dough start to shrink back into its shape once you’ve rolled it, so you need to apply a healthy amount of pressure to the dough to get it to stay rolled out.  The recipe calls for us to roll the dough to 1/8 inch, which is very thin – the concept is, because you’re folding the dough over to make the pierogi, you end up with 1/4 inch pasta in the finished product, just with some filling in between.  However, if your pasta is just a little bit thicker, it’s easier to work with and we didn’t find that it ruined the dish.  At the end of the process, James made a few pierogi that were 1/4 inch thick before he folded them and we can’t even find those among the others.  So the thickness is not going to screw up your pierogi!DSC_0107

Filling pierogi:
We really had a lot of fun during this part of the process.  It’s time-consuming and a little intimidating at first, which is why I created a short video to show how I did it from start to finish.

The steps are as follows:

  1. Once we rolled the dough out, we cut circles out with our biscuit cutter, which is 2 & 3/4 inch in diameter.  The exact size doesn’t matter a lot because…
  2. Then stretch the dough to be just a little bit larger, stretching the outside and turning the dough, just like a pizza, so that you can fit a healthy amount of filling inside.
  3. Measure out a rounded teaspoon of the filling and place it on one side of the circle.
  4. Flatten the filling, so it will fit the crescent moon shape.
  5. Moisten the edges with a little bit of water.
  6. Fold the pasta over and crimp with a fork.
    1. I like to make the first indentation, then for the next, I put the outside tine of the fork in the last indentation I made so that the crimps are evenly spaced.

Obviously this part of the process takes the longest.  I’d say it took us about an hour to do, although we were also preparing other parts of our meal at the same time.  But it was extremely satisfying, watching this pasta and mashed potatoes become something beautiful, this shape from my childhood that had only ever come from a Mrs. T’s freezer bag.  That is my absolute favorite part of cooking, possibly more than actually eating – when the ingredients come together and you can actually see the food take form.DSC_0137

Now once all the pierogi were finished, they sat for a while before we boiled them.  This was probably the biggest surprise when we tried to move them – the dough is wet and stuck to the plates we were storing them on, which then mangled our lovingly made shapes!  As James was tending to the pot, I had to very gingerly pry them off the plate and flip them onto their tops, which had dried just enough not to stick.  How can this sticking be avoided?  I’m not positive, but I think storing them on a different surface, like the wood cutting board, would be helpful.  We could store them on plates lined with parchment paper, and I’d recommend two layers, because the dough is wet enough to soak through the parchment, which would defeat the purpose.  You could also very lightly dust the plate before placing the pierogi down on it.  That’s probably what I’ll do next time.

You should use a large pot of water to boil your pierogi, which we did not do.  We were only able to get 5 pierogi in the pot at a time, which resulted in long cooking time and very cloudy water by the end.  The water will get cloudier than if you use dried pasta, so make sure you use a lot of water and your biggest pot!

This pot is not big enough...
This pot is not big enough…

However, fresh pierogi also cook very fast, so they’ll float to the top in 2-3 minutes.  Once they float, they’re done and can be fished out using a slotted spoon.

The original recipe says to serve the pierogi this way, but that’s not the way I remember them and certainly not what James was envisioning.  Oh no – we fried them up in olive oil for a golden brown finish and a crisp exterior.  What I found fascinating is that some of the pierogi had gotten really ugly and mangled, but once we fried them – it just didn’t matter.  It was as if my brain couldn’t even compute that they looked different than the others.  That golden brown color means “YUM ME EAT NOW” in my brain, no matter what.

Mangled, yet still looks delicious
Mangled, yet still looks delicious

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James fried up some onions low and slow to accompany the pierogi, also something I’m rather accustomed to when eating pierogi.  The apartment smelled amazing.  I think I’d like to make a fried onion scented candle.DSC_0167

We had about 50 small pierogi to enjoy and so we did, for several days now.  Pierogi are a great cooking project to take on: what would be even better is to take it on with a few friends, so you can all learn and work together, accompanied by some cold beers.  The process will go faster and you won’t be eating at 9pm… like we were.  Also starting earlier in the day would be a good rule of thumb.

Have you made pierogi before and have tips?  Is there anything you’re wondering about that I haven’t covered?  Hit me up in the comments below.DSC_0156DSC_0229

Thanks for coming along on our Pierogi Journey!

Caesar Crusted Chicken with Roasted Romaine

If you make a recipe 4 weeks in a row, it’s time to share it with the world.

James and I have been really into roasting for the past few months.  We’re a busy couple of kids and looking to maximize our time, so roasting can come in handy: you prep the ingredients, put them in the oven and then you have time to clean up and set the table and all that good stuff.  Plus, roasting makes food taste delicious!

So when I came upon this recipe on Bon Appetit, I was rather intrigued and it did not disappoint.  First of all, it taught me that I don’t always need to  go through the flour-egg-breading process – this recipe has you mix together a breading and pat it on top of the chicken before it goes into the oven.  That’s it.

Secondly, grilling hearts of romaine has been trendy for years now but I’ve never tried it – mainly because I don’t have a grill.  I was delighted to see that you can roast romaine at a high heat for the same effect.  It’s incredibly easy, very quick and tastes amazing – it completely changes the romaine into an entirely new experience:  crunchy but with the satisfying flavors of a sauteed green.

The original recipe uses a lot of flavors you’d find it a Caesar salad (hence the name) including anchovies – but I’ve omitted them.  They really gross me out.  If you’re into them, go ahead and give them a try.  (The recipe added them to the romaine after it was baked.)

Caesar Crusted Chicken with Roasted Romaine

Ingredients:

  • 4 – 7 oz. boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 1/2 cup grated parmigiano-reggiano, plus extra for romaine
  • 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs, plus extra for romaine
  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons dried herbs de provence (parsley and thyme also worked well for us)
  • 2 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 2 hearts of romaine (more, depending on your appetite – I can eat a whole romaine heart by myself)
  • garlic olive oil for drizzling
  • 1 lemon, cut into wedges

Procedure:

  1. Preheat the oven to 450ºF
  2. Mix together cheese, bread crumbs, olive oil, herbs de provence, and garlic.  Season with salt and pepper (remember, parmigiano is quite salty itself.)
  3. Arrange chicken breasts on a baking sheet.  Take a handful of breading and pat gently on top of the chicken breasts to ensure adhesion
  4. Bake chicken breasts for about 20 minutes, or until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast reads 165ºF
  5. Meanwhile, cut your romaine heads in half and arrange on a baking sheet
  6. Drizzle with garlic olive oil, sprinkle with bread crumbs, parmigiano, salt and pepper
  7. Bake romaine halves for 5 minutes.
  8. Squeeze lemon juice onto both chicken and romaine.  Enjoy!

Procedure with Pictures and Anecdotes

Cranking your oven up to 450ºF is the key to the speed of this recipe.  You want to keep an eye on your chicken, especially the first time you make the recipe.  I recommend checking the temperature every 5 minutes after you pass the first 10 minutes of cooking.  The temperature can go from under-cooked to overcooked very quickly.

I know in Buttermilk-Brined Chicken I said that I hated washing the garlic press and avoided using it, but I’ve come around.  We have a new garlic press that doesn’t take nearly as much effort for me to use and that won me over.  Also, this amazing little gadget that came with it – a silicone garlic peeler.  Usually I would smash a knife into the garlic clove to break it free of its skin, but this is so much more fun!  Insert the garlic cloves into the silicone tube, press down firmly and roll them on the counter.  Within seconds, perfectly peeled garlic gloves.  Washing it only takes a rinse with water – I totally recommend it!

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Patting the breading onto the chicken doesn’t seem instinctive, but its helped along by the fact that the breading is a little wet, from the olive oil and the fat in the cheese.  It helps stick together nicely.  As you can see in the pictures below, I cup my hand with the mixture, get my hand right next to the chicken breast and then quickly flip my hand over onto the chicken to coat.  Some of the breadcrumbs will fall off and that’s just fine.

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Cutting the romaine isn’t intuitive either.  The first time I tried it, I cut from the stem end of the heart, but I found starting in the middle actually worked better somehow.  The last time I made the recipe, I actually cut the stems off of the romaine once they were in the pan.  It’s easier to eat that way and, as long as you have some tongs to transport them from pan to plate, it shouldn’t cause any problems.

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I have found that reheating the romaine doesn’t work out great.  But since it takes so little time, I cook the romaine from scratch when reheating the chicken for leftovers.

And now some pictures of the finished product.  Look at how gorgeous the breading becomes!

DSC_0091DSC_0098The lemon is definitely makes the dish – do not leave it out!  I like using wedges because it’s easy – my juicer is kind of a production.  Also, looks very classy for a weeknight…

Hail Caesar!

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(For extra credit, we tried combining this chicken with our favorite stand-by recipe Roasted Chicken with Apples.  The results were delectable !  If you become obsessed with this recipe like me, give that rendition a whirl.)

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Bonnie Mac and Cheese

The time has come.  It’s been years of pain, discomfort and embarrassment avoiding high fat food due to the 2 centimeter-sized gallstones in my belly.  But finally I can share with you all – I can eat cheese again!  Pain free!!!

It took about 6 weeks until I was finally ready to try cheese again.  The gallbladder surgery makes you feel funky and it takes a while for your body to figure out how it should digest again.  But at a rainy beach weekend with my girlfriends, I dared to say “No it’s okay – I’ll eat the pizza.”  They were terrified of what might happen to me (nothing that would be inconvenient for them, thank goodness), but we went ahead and ordered the pizza.  I went ahead and ate the pizza.  And then … NOTHING HAPPENED.  Which is the point!  No hot flash, no sweating, no cramping, no needing to lie down.  I could enjoy that pizza and that’s all.  Pure bliss!  (It was really good pizza with arugula and prosciutto, too, a fitting way to enter back into cheesedom.)

But enough about pizza I got in Rehoboth, let’s talk about cheese we can enjoy together.  If my title is any indication, as soon as I knew I could make cheese, I immediately bought some extra sharp cheddar and made the greatest cheese dish on earth: mac and cheese.  Cheese sauce.  Pasta.  Heaven.

One of my favorite things about cooking is watching ingredients turn into something else.  Which I know sounds “DUH”, but I don’t mean roasting a tomato, although that is amazing.  I mean taking cream and whipping it into fluffy clouds or beating together a batter that becomes cake (Reenie Cake, naturally.)  Well the Mac and Cheese recipe I’m about to share with you is another one of those – you take butter, flour and milk to create a thick, velvety sauce before your eyes that just needs cheese added to it. It’s amazing.

The recipe comes from my favorite cook book Cooking School Secrets for Real World Cooks by Linda Carucci.  I’ve given this book as gifts to many aspiring cooks because it is exactly what it promises – simple, easy-to-follow advice to make extremely stunning and impressive food.  Linda had me cooking risotto and cheese-stuffed chicken breasts very early into my cooking endeavors.  And she taught me so much about food and cooking that I’ve applied to many recipes of my own.  God bless you, Linda.

I make this recipe exactly (almost) as Linda describes and she turns fancy french cooking into something possible for this amateur here.  We’re going to make a roux, add milk to make a béchamel sauce and add cheese to make a Mornay Sauce.  Sound scary?  It’s not!  But it is weird

When you start to add the milk to the roux, the mixture seizes up into a big clump, so you need to add more milk quickly and keep stirring.  My only complaint is that Linda doesn’t describe what happens when you add milk to the roux.  She only says “Have faith and continue to add the milk.”  Rather ominous.

So in order to help you visualize this recipe, James, angel that he is, filmed the entire progression for you and helped me edit this video into true perfection.  This will allow you to see all the various stages so you, too, can achieve homemade mac and cheese glory.  I am here to serve. (THANK YOU, JAMES!!!)

This recipe asks you to be stirring almost constantly for about 15-minutes, which I really love.  It’s a simple recipe, but you’re really earning that creamy sauce, putting lots of love and effort into the dish.  You feel very accomplished when it’s done – and you SHOULD.  You just made homemade mac and cheese!  You’re the bomb.

Ready, Get Set – BONNIE MAC AND CHEESE!

(I do require that you refer to the dish that way from now on.  In honor of my struggles.  I think I deserve it.)

The following video will show you the progression of the sauce.  Specific times for each step are indicated below.

Mac and Cheese

  • Servings: Possible to serve 6-8, depending on how willing you are to share...
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Adapted ever so slightly from the “Macaroni and Cheese Variation” written by Linda Carucci in Cooking School Secrets for Real World Cooks

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. medium shell pasta
  • 6 TBL unsalted butter (I use salted butter and adjust the salt at the end)
  • 5 TBL flour
  • 3 cups milk (I have always used 1%, but I’m sure whole milk would be delightfully decadent)
  • 2 cups (.5 lb) shredded extra sharp cheddar cheese
  • 2 tsp kosher salt plus more for pasta water (with salted butter, I ended up using 1 tsp at the end)
  • A few shakes of hot sauce or 1/4 tsp of cayenne pepper

Procedure:

  1. Boil water in a large pot, add salt and pasta and cook until al dente.
  2. Measure out all of your ingredients and grate your cheese.
  3. In a 3 qt. pot, melt your butter.
  4. Add your flour and whisk together roux for about 2 minutes. (0:23)
  5. Add the milk 1/4 cup at a time, mixing in between.  The mixture will change texture several times as you add. (0:42)
  6. Continue to add milk 1/4 cup at a time until the mixture turns smooth.  Add all remaining milk at this time. (2:45)
  7. When the milk is combined, switch to a slotted spoon and stir in a figure-8 motion (3:24) until you’ve reached the napé stage (when you can draw a line in the sauce on the back of the spoon and it stays in tact, without filling in.) (4:05)
  8. Add your cheese, about a 1/2 cup at a time, and stir to combine in between each addition. (4:15)
  9. Taste your sauce (careful, it’s hot!) and add salt and hot sauce as desired. (6:00)
  10. Pour your sauce over your cooked pasta and serve or store.

Procedure with Pictures and Anecdotes

  1. Boil water in a large pot, add salt and pasta and cook until al dente.

I cooked my pasta almost as soon as I came in the door from work, far before I was making the cheese sauce.  When the pasta was fully cooked, I drained and coated with the lightest coat of olive oil I could manage, to keep it from sticking.

This isn’t usually recommended, because the olive oil covers the natural starches brought to the surface of the pasta when cooked, which helps grab onto the sauce.  But as far as time management is concerned, I found this much easier.  I like to cook my pasta in my largest pot, which gives it room to move around in the water while cooking, but it also takes a long time for the water to boil – sometimes 15 – 20 minutes.

The pasta cooled to room temperature, but when the hot cheese sauce was poured on the pasta, the dish  was heated back up again.  I found this tactic much easier than cooking the pasta and making the sauce at the same time, because the sauce needs your full concentration.

I enjoy using Medium Shell pasta, because the sauce gets stuck in the shells like delightful little bowls of cheese sauce.  Mmmmm…

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2.  Measure out all of your ingredients and grate your cheese.

Mise en place (everything in its place) will be your friend.  Again, the sauce will take your full concentration for those 15 minutes.  Be prepared!

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You can use any cheese in this recipe, although cheddar is most traditional.  Just make sure to do a little research on which cheese is a good melting cheese.  Not all cheeses melt well and can become stringy or clumpy.  Here’s a good article with a couple suggestions – I really want to try smoky gouda next.

3.  In a 3 qt. pot, melt your butter.

You can use a larger pot, but I think that a 3 qt. pot should be your minimum.  You’re doing a lot of whisking and stirring and a smaller pot could cause sloshing of hot liquid onto your feet!  Not fun.

Cut your butter into tablespoon-sized pats first, for quicker melting.20140808_201456

See video for visual of steps 4 through 9.

4.  Add your flour and whisk together roux for about 2 minutes. (0:23)

This will cook the flour in the butter, for added flavor.

5.  Add the milk 1/4 cup at a time, mixing in between.  The mixture will change texture several times as you add.  (0:42)

6.  Continue to add milk 1/4 cup at a time until the mixture turns smooth.  Add all remaining milk at this time.  (2:45)  (This actually happens at 1.25 cups, but I read the recipe wrong – ha!  I added all the milk at when there was just 1 cup left.  Things still turned out fine.)

7.  When the milk is combined, switch to a slotted spoon and stir in a figure-8 motion (3:24) until you’ve reached the napé stage (when you can draw a line in the sauce on the back of the spoon and it stays intact, without filling in.) (4:05)

8.  Add your cheese, about a 1/2 cup at a time, and stir to combine in between each addition. (4:15)

9.  Taste your sauce (careful, it’s hot!) and add salt and hot sauce as desired.  (6:00)

I think the hot sauce is clutch in this recipe, but I didn’t add it when I made this video because the dish was made for two dear friends who are also new parents and hot sauce is not for everyone.  I, personally, add the hot sauce and  pour the hot sauce over the mac and cheese when it’s on my plate.  The hotness cuts through the rich cheese sauce with delightful contrast.

10.  Pour your sauce over your cooked pasta and serve or store.

20140808_20391020140808_20392320140808_204114Oh yeah, girl.